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  • Subject: African American musicians
(23 results)



Display: 20

    • Oral history interview with Robert Key.

    • African Americans; African American singers; African American musicians; Nightclubs--Kentucky--Louisville; Singers; Musicians
    • Oral history interview with Robert Key, conducted October 25, 1977 by Robert Friedman. Mr. Key was a musician. He was born in Louisville but really launched his career in Chicago before touring as a singer. In this interview, he discusses his...
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band, November 15, 1919.

    • Jug bands; Musicians; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Guitars; Banjos; Violins; African American musicians; African Americans; People; Men
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, pose with their instruments. Wearing chef uniforms, the African American musicians play guitar, banjo, fiddle and jug.
    • Luncheon party, 1927.

    • Jug bands; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; Parties; Segregation; People
    • A group of African American musicians kneels in the foreground. They wear overalls and straw hats and each hold an instrument including jug, guitar, banjo, and saxophone. In a covered outdoor area at three rows of tables a large group of mostly...
    • Simmons University music class and instructors, Louisville, Kentucky, 1920s.

    • Simmons University (Louisville, Ky.); African American universities and colleges; African American college students; College students; African American college teachers; Teachers; African American educators; African Americans--Education (Higher);...
    • Mrs. Mamie E. Steward and Music Classes, per the back of the photograph. The university has gone by many names since its founding in 1879: The Kentucky Normal and Theological Institute (1879), State University (1883), Simmons University (1921),...
    • Jones Orchestra at Schneider's Road House, 1921.

    • African American musicians; Musicians; African Americans; Trombones; Trumpets; Saxophones; Drums (Musical instruments); Pianos; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Violins; Banjos; People
    • Six African American musicians perform in an open pavilion. The drum reads "Jones Orchestra." Other instruments include trombone, violin, banjo, piano, trumpet, and saxophone. Outside of the pavilion tables are set up.
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band, December 24, 1929.

    • Jug bands; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Banjos; Violins; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, pose with their instruments. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and each hold instruments: banjos, fiddle, and jug.
    • Ballard Chefs Quartet, December 24, 1929.

    • Radio broadcasting; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; Microphones; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a quartet who had their own radio show on Louisville's WHAS, pose for a portrait. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and are in front of a microphone with WHAS on top.
    • Ballard Chefs Quartet, December 24, 1929.

    • Radio broadcasting; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; Microphones; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a quartet who had their own radio show on Louisville's WHAS, pose for a portrait. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and are in front of a microphone with WHAS on top.
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band, December 24, 1929.

    • Jug bands; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Banjos; Violins; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, pose with their instruments. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and each hold instruments: banjos, fiddle and jug.
    • Ballard Chefs Quartet, December 24, 1929.

    • Radio broadcasting; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; Microphones; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a quartet who had their own radio show on Louisville's WHAS, pose for a portrait. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and are in front of a microphone with WHAS on top.
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band, December 24, 1929.

    • Radio broadcasting; Jug bands; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; Microphones; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Banjos; Violins; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, play their instruments. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and each plays an instrument: banjos, fiddle, and jug in front of a WHAS microphone.
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band with instruments, December 28, 1931.

    • Jug bands; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Guitars; Banjos; Violins; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, pose with their instruments. The five African American men wear chefs' garb and each play instruments: guitars, banjo, fiddle, and jug. This photo was taken at the Greater Louisville Bank & Loan Association meeting.
    • Ballard Chefs Quartet, December 28, 1931.

    • Radio broadcasting; Jug bands; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; Microphones; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a quartet who had their own radio show on WHAS, pose for a portrait. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and are in front of a microphone with WHAS on top.
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band, September 13, 1932.

    • Jug bands; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Guitars; Banjos; Violins; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, pose with their instruments. The five African American men wear chefs' garb and each play instruments: steel guitar, acoustic guitar, banjo, fiddle, and jug.
    • Ballard Chefs Jug Band, September 14, 1933.

    • Jug bands; Stringed instruments; Wind instruments; Guitars; Banjos; Violins; African American musicians; African Americans; Musicians; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a jug band, pose with their instruments. The five African American men wear chefs' garb and each play instruments: guitars, banjo, fiddle, and jug.
    • Ballard Chefs Quartet, December 24, 1929.

    • Radio broadcasting; African American musicians; Musicians; African Americans; Microphones; People
    • The Ballard Chefs, a quartet who had their own radio show on Louisville's WHAS. The four African American men wear chefs' garb and are in front of a microphone with WHAS on top.
    • WHAS broadcast, 1931.

    • Radio broadcasting; Jug bands; African American musicians; Pianos; Microphones; African Americans; Musicians; People
    • A man in a suit stands holding a WHAS microphone. Next to him is a woman seated at a piano as if ready to play. Sheet music is propped on the piano's stand and the piano keys are exposed.

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